Iced Coffee vs. Iced Latte - The Differences Explained!

In a world as busy as ours, coffee and other caffeinated drinks are a must. Plus, they’re delicious!

At coffee shops around the world, some of the most commonly ordered drinks are iced coffee and iced lattes, but how different are these drinks really? They might be more distinct than you think!

In this article, we’ll discuss iced coffee vs. iced lattes, how they differ from one another, their ingredients, caffeine content, and so much more. Read on to discover everything you’ve ever needed to know about the differences between iced coffee and iced lattes.

Iced Coffee vs. Iced Latte

Even though they might look similar once they’re in a cup, iced coffee and iced lattes aren’t actually the same drink. Although there are similarities like having caffeine, being highly customizable flavor-wise, and being deliciously cold and milky, these two drinks aren’t interchangeable!

What Is an Iced Coffee Made From?

Traditionally, iced coffee is made from hot or cold brewed coffee and ice cubes. It almost always contains a type of milk as well, like regular cows milk, heavy cream, oat milk, almond milk, or any other milk substitute.

Iced coffee can also contain flavor additives, both in dry spice and flavor syrup form.

Ratio of iced coffee: Either 100% black coffee or 90% black coffee with 10% milk or cream.

What Is an Iced Latte Made From?

An iced latte is made from espresso, ice, and milk or cream of some sort. Like iced coffee, milk substitutes work just as well as regular milk.

Iced lattes can’t be served black; otherwise, it would just be a shot of espresso over ice. Flavor additives also go nicely with iced lattes.

Ratio of iced latte: 3 parts milk to 1 part espresso.

The Differences Between Iced Coffee and Iced Latte

The differences in iced coffee and iced lattes are all in the ingredients; iced coffees use hot or cold brewed coffee and iced lattes use espresso as the coffee element. 

While the espresso in the iced latte is stronger on its own, it is much more diluted by milk than the brewed coffee of an iced coffee. This means an iced coffee is going to have a stronger coffee flavor than an iced latte.

Which Is Healthier: Iced Coffee or Iced Latte?

Figuring out whether iced coffees or iced lattes are healthier really depends on how you prefer to drink them. A black iced coffee with no milk is going to be nearly zero calories, but the calorie count goes up as soon as you add milk or flavorings.

The same holds true for iced lattes, but because iced lattes contain more milk than iced coffees, they naturally have a higher caloric count than black iced coffee.

Calculating the calorie count of any coffee can get confusing when additives are put into the mix, but our simple charts below can help.

If you’re going strictly by calorie count, then an iced coffee is the healthier of the 2 choices. 

Iced Coffee Calories

Black iced coffee has 1 calorie per serving, but this changes when you add things like milk or sweetener.

Calories of Iced Coffee With Milks
Skim Milk + Black Iced Coffee 15 calories
2% Milk + Black Iced Coffee 26 calories
Full Fat Milk + Black Iced Coffee 30 calories
Calories of Iced Coffees With Sweeteners
Iced Coffee + Sugar 16 calories per tsp of sugar
Iced Coffee + Flavored Coffee Syrup 20 calories per pump
Iced Coffee + Agave Liquid Sweetener 21 calories per tsp

Iced Latte Calories

Iced lattes have higher calorie counts than iced coffees, but they can vary depending on which milks or sweeteners are added. For example, iced lattes with skim milk will have fewer calories than iced lattes with full-fat milk and sugar.

 

Calories of Iced Latte With Milks
Skim Milk + Iced Latte 67 calories
2% Milk + Iced Latte 120 calories
Full Fat Milk + Iced Latte 136 calories
Calories of Iced Latte With Sweeteners
Iced Latte + Sugar 16 calories per tsp of sugar
Iced Latte + Flavored Coffee Syrup 20 calories per pump
Iced Latte + Agave Liquid Sweetener 21 calories per tsp

Which Has More Caffeine: Iced Coffee or Iced Latte?

All of the caffeine in iced coffees and iced lattes come from the espresso or coffee within. Espresso as a rule has a higher caffeine content than brewed coffee, but things get a little more complicated when you consider the fact that there is more coffee in an iced coffee than there is espresso in an iced latte.

  • Caffeine in 1 shot of espresso: 95mg
  • Caffeine in 1 serving of coffee 75mg

McDonalds, Starbucks,  And Dunkin’ Donuts Iced Coffees and Iced Coffees

Three of the most popular places to get iced coffees and iced lattes are McDonalds, Starbucks, and Dunkin’ Donuts. These drinks can vary in ratios, ingredients, sweeteners, and calorie content.

Starbucks, being a traditional coffee shop, has no additives, while the other two fast food restaurants might have extra ingredients you wouldn’t expect.

Below, we’ve listed the calories, sugar, and caffeine content of the iced coffees and lattes from these 3 restaurants. 

 

Iced Coffee vs. Iced Latte at Starbucks

Calories

Iced Coffee: 80 calories 

Iced Latte: 130 calories

 

Sugar

Iced Coffee: 20 grams 

Iced Latte: 11 grams 

 

Caffeine

Iced Coffee: 165 milligrams 

Iced Latte: 150 milligrams

Iced Coffee vs. Iced Latte At McDonalds

Calories

Iced Coffee: 180 calories 

Iced Latte: 120 calories 

Sugar

Iced Coffee: 28 grams 

Iced Latte: 9 grams 

Caffeine

Iced Coffee: 12 milligrams 

Iced Latte: 14 milligrams

Iced Coffee vs. Iced Latte Dunkin’ Donuts

Calories

Iced Coffee: 5 calories 

Iced Latte: 50 calories 

Sugar

Iced Coffee: 0 grams 

Iced Latte: 1 gram 

Caffeine

Iced Coffee: 297 milligrams 

Iced Latte: 166 milligrams

Iced Coffee vs. Iced Cappuccino vs. Iced Latte vs. Iced Macchiato

  • Iced Coffee: Cold coffee, served either black with some sort of milk or cream, and over ice. Optionally, sweetener or flavors can be added.
  • Iced Cappuccino: Espresso over ice with some sort of milk or cream and topped with milk foam. Can also have sweeteners or flavors added.
  • Iced Latte: Espresso over ice with some kind of milk or cream. Usually 1 shot of espresso is used, and sweetener or flavors can be added as well.
  • Iced Macchiato: A layered espresso drink, with milk or cream poured over ice and carefully topped with espresso. If flavor or sweetener is to be added, it is layered below the espresso.

Common Questions

  • Which Iced Drink Has the Most Caffeine: Iced Lattes or Iced Coffees?

Typically, an iced coffee will have more caffeine than an iced latte, even though the espresso in an iced latte has more caffeine per volume than the brewed coffee in an iced coffee.

Since there is so much more coffee than espresso in the respective iced drinks, iced coffees end up having more caffeine.

  • Is an Iced Coffee Sweeter Than an Iced Latte?

Iced coffees and iced lattes both typically contain no sweetener, so in their most basic forms, neither are sweet. Which one ends up being sweeter depends on how much flavor or sweetener is added to the drink by the consumer.

  • What Is the Difference Between Espresso and Coffee?

It might surprise you to know that espresso is a type of coffee. The real difference comes in how espresso and the brewed coffee used in iced coffee is prepared.

Espresso is highly concentrated coffee, traditionally a dark roast, that is brewed under high pressure to create the incredibly strong caffeinated drink. Espresso also has a crema foam on top.

Brewed coffee is made when water is used to extract flavor from ground coffee beans. Hot or cold water can be used.

Final Thoughts

Although they both have distinct differences, iced coffees and iced lattes are both wonderfully chilled coffee drinks that can put a pep in our step when we need it. They are highly customizable to our individual tastes, so whether you like flavored, unsweetened, or sweetened coffees, either of these iced drinks might work for you.

Now that you know the difference between the two, it will be so much easier to pick your favorites! Or maybe you enjoy both iced coffees and iced lattes, and it just depends on what sort of drink you’re craving day to day.

If you want a strong coffee flavor, or a black, nearly 0 zero calorie coffee, then iced coffee is the way to go. Since this drink can be taken black, it’s the best choice for people trying to cut calories.

If you want more room for milk or cream, go with the iced latte. An iced latte can be made stronger with additional espresso shots as well.

 


How to Make Proffee (Protein Coffee Seen On TikTok)

Proffee (protein + coffee = proffee) is one of the latest TikTok trends to go viral, and people are going crazy over this new coffee fad. So, how do you make proffee?

Making proffee is about as easy as it sounds, all it takes is coffee, protein powder (or a protein shake) and some ice! The best part about making proffee, aside from the number of health benefits, is that you can customize it to your liking! This energizing, post-workout drink is a great way to combine your coffee and your protein in one delicious, refreshing beverage. 

The rest of this article will be your go-to-guide to proffee! What it is, how to make it, and why you should include it in your daily routine.

What is Proffee?

Proffee is a combination of coffee and protein that has recently gained a significant amount of popularity on TikTok. Known for its fantastic ability to get you your coffee and protein at the same time, proffee is most commonly used as a post-workout drink or a wake up drink, giving you a kick start to your day.

Proffee is typically made to be an iced coffee, but if you prefer it can be made hot. The only problem with this is that protein powder gets clumpy when warmed, which can make your job a bit more difficult.

This homemade drink is an excellent combination of protein and caffeine, and the best part is that you can experiment with it and make it your own. Some people have made proffee lattes, collagen coffee, etc!

Is Proffee Good for You?

Proffee is actually very good for you, and can have a number of health benefits when consumed in moderation. If consumed in excess, like many things, too much proffee can have the same effect as too much coffee, such as making you anxious or jittery.

Proffee is a rich source of antioxidants and nutrients such as riboflavin, potassium, and vitamin B. Vitamin B can help the body produce energy. The kick from caffeine can help to improve endurance and athletic performance, as well as enhancing mood and reaction time as well as improving memory.

A cup of coffee each day has been shown to decrease the chance of type 2 diabetes, liver disease, cancer, neurological diseases, and depression. Adding protein is an added bonus, as you need protein to keep your body functioning well. Drinking proffee first thing in the morning can give you the perfect kick start for your day, as well as reducing excess hunger later.

Proffee can also be healthier than regular coffee because protein powders come in various flavors, allowing you to customize your coffee to your liking without adding more unhealthy, sugary creamers.

How to Make Proffee

Proffee is quick and easy to make, and all it takes is a couple of ingredients and a few simple steps!

What You’ll Need

To make proffee, you will need:

  • A coffee maker or an espresso maker (depending on the type of coffee you are using)
  • A shaker or a whisk and bowl (if you’re using protein powder)
  • A mug or a glass (for the final product of course!)
  • Optional: Sweeteners such as coffee creamers or syrups

Note: if you are using a protein shake, you can simply use that in place of the protein powder

It is recommended that you use 1 cup of coffee or 1-2 espresso shots, 1 cup of a protein shake or 1-2 scoops of protein powder, and ½ a cup of ice to achieve the perfect ratio of coffee and protein for your proffee. However, you are welcome to experiment with the amount of each ingredient to make your proffee to your liking.

Putting it All Together

To make proffee, you will need to: 

  1. Brew a cup of coffee (or espresso shots)
  2. Prepare a protein shake or protein powder (if using protein powder, mix the powder with water before adding it to the coffee)
  3. Mix everything together

And voila! You have yourself an excellent glass of proffee.

What is the Best Protein for Proffee?

There are a number of protein options for proffee, and there is no specific protein that will make or break your cup of proffee.

The protein powder you use can be changed based on your own preferences, such as flavors. There are many flavors to choose from when it comes to protein powders, such as vanilla and chocolate. The only suggestion when it comes to flavored protein powder is that you avoid fruity flavors or other kinds that would not pair well with coffee.

Instead of protein powder, some people recommend using a protein shake, since it is already made to drink. With a protein shake, all you need to do is mix it with coffee. When it comes to using protein powder, you need to mix it with water before adding it to the coffee in order to make it drinkable.

You can use either flavored or unflavored protein, however when using an unflavored protein powder you might want to add a sweetener, but that depends on personal preference. Some people have even experimented with different types of powder, such as collagen peptides powder for a specific type of protein. If you’re looking for specific brands, experts recommend Naked Nutrition, Designer Protein, Pure Protein, or Further Foods Collagen.

What is the Best Coffee for Proffee?

Similar to protein, there are a number of coffee options for proffee, and the type that is best depends entirely on your own personal likes and dislikes.

Regular iced coffee can be used for proffee, and whichever blend you like best will work just fine. Cold brew coffee, french press coffee, and pour over coffee will also work very well for proffee.

Another option is adding espresso shots to your proffee, and most people prefer to use one or two. Espresso shots are the most commonly used coffee added to protein shakes.

What Does Proffee Taste Like?

Before making proffee, you might want to know if it’s worth it taste-wise. Of course, why would you make it if it tastes bad?

The good news for you is that the taste of proffee depends entirely on the specific ingredients used. Different protein powders have different flavors, which you can pick based on your own preferences! So, not only is this drink full of health benefits and easy to make, it is entirely customizable!

What is the Difference Between Proffee and a Protein Shake? 

There is a lot of hype surrounding proffee, but what makes it so different from a protein shake, and why is this difference significant?

The most significant difference between proffee and a protein shake is the amount of caffeine. A protein shake is typically made with milk or water, while proffee is made with coffee. A regular protein shake will not typically contain any caffeine. Proffee, on the other hand, includes caffeine as it is made with coffee, and the amount of caffeine will vary based on which kind of coffee you use.

What is the Difference Between Proffee and Coffee?

As silly as it may sound, this is actually not an absurd question to be asking. If you’re an avid coffee drinker, you may not want to alter your coffee routine, or you might not think it will make much of a difference.

However, while the difference between proffee and coffee seems small, it can actually have quite an impact on your day. Proffee contains protein that coffee does not, and since consuming coffee already has health benefits, the protein that you consume in addition to the coffee is merely an added bonus!

Conclusion 

Proffee may sound a bit odd at first, but this trend hasn’t become viral on TikTok for no reason! Proffee is an innovative way to get both your protein and your caffeine, and start your day off with an extra boost.

Whether drinking it after a hard workout or right after waking up, proffee can give you that jolt of caffeine as well as a ton of protein to help give you energy and keep you moving throughout the day! It is easy to make, and you can use different ingredients to truly make it your own!

Proffee can be made customized exactly to your own likes and dislikes, allowing you to use different types of coffee, protein powder/protein shakes, and sweeteners!

Start your day off right with a fresh, homemade glass of proffee!


The Best Low-Calorie Starbucks Frappuccino Drinks

Do you want to enjoy Starbucks’ delicious blended frappuccino drinks without having to deal with all the calories? In this guide, we’re highlighting 10 of the best low-calorie Starbucks frappuccinos so that you can easily locate them on the menu.

These drinks all contain less than 350 calories for a tall serving size, but they have varying levels of fat, sugar, carbs, and other nutrients.

Ways to Customize a Frappuccino for Fewer Calories

Here are a few simple ways to lower the caloric content of your Starbucks frapp.

Switch to Low-Fat Add-Ins

Request skim milk or soy milk instead of whole or 2% milk to pack in fewer calories. You might also ask for low-fat flavor syrups when they’re available.

Request a Healthier Milk Option

Skim (fat-free) milk is way lower in calories than whole milk. You can also cut calories by choosing a dairy alternative, such as almond milk, soy milk, or coconut milk.

Request Less Syrup/Flavoring

Syrups and sauces are fattening and full of sugar, meaning they add unnecessary calories to your frapps.

Choose Sugar-Free Add-Ins

Choosing sugar-free syrups, when they’re offered, can also lower the caloric content of a blended drink.

Skip Toppings Altogether

And if you want to straight-up cut out certain calories, ask for no whipped cream, no drizzle toppings, or no frappuccino chips.

Favorite Low-Cal Starbucks Frappuccinos (Less Than 350 Calories)

The best low-calorie Starbucks Frappuccinos include flavors like Strawberries & Creme, Espresso, Java Chip, and Coffee, among others.

These figures (including calorie, carb, and sugar content) are based on a standard tall sized frappuccino beverage (12 ounces) on the official Starbucks menu. They’re also all based on frappuccino recipes using 2% or whole milk and regular sweeteners/flavors.

  1. Starbucks Strawberries & Creme Frappuccino
  2. Starbucks Espresso Frappuccino Drink
  3. Starbucks Coffee Frappuccino
  4. Starbucks Java Chip Frappuccino Drink
  5. Starbucks Vanilla Bean Creme Frappuccino
  6. Starbucks Cinnamon Dolce Creme Frappuccino
  7. Starbucks Chai Creme Frappuccino
  8. Starbucks White Chocolate Creme Frappuccino
  9. Starbucks Caramel Frappuccino
  10. Starbucks Double Chocolaty Chip Creme Frappuccino

1. Starbucks Strawberries & Creme Frappuccino

This blended frapp beverage at Starbucks is a refreshing choice in warmer months, incorporating fruity and creamy flavors.

It includes strawberry puree, classic sweetener syrup, vanilla whipped cream, milk, and ice. It’s super friendly to low-cal diets, but it has a lot of sugar and fat content to be aware of.

Take a look at the nutritional profile of a Strawberries & Creme Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

  • Calories: 260
  • Calories from fat: 90
  • Sugar (g): 39
  • Fat (g): 10
  • Caffeine (mg): little to none
  • Carbohydrates (g): 40
  • Cholesterol (mg): 35

2. Starbucks Espresso Frappuccino Drink

Unlike many other frappuccino recipes at Starbucks, this one is fairly caffeinated, owing to the espresso and coffee content. Similar to the Upside Down Espresso, it’s made with milk, ice, coffee-flavored frappuccino syrup, brewed espresso, and coffee.

This blended drink is perfect for those who want a refreshing cold drink that doesn’t compromise on the nutty, coffee flavor!

Here is the nutritional profile of an Espresso Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

Calories: 150

Calories from fat: 9

Sugar (g): 33

Fat (g): 1

Caffeine (mg): more than 100

Carbohydrates (g): 34

Cholesterol (mg): 5

Sodium (mg): 140

Protein (g): 2

3. Starbucks Coffee Frappuccino

This is another Starbucks frapp favorite among fans of more bitter-tasting refreshments. The coffee-flavored frappuccino drink is a blend of ice, milk, coffee, and coffee-flavored frappuccino syrup.

It combines classic Starbucks flavors with a low-fat recipe so that fans of more caffeinated frapps can get the best of both worlds.

Here is the nutritional profile of a Coffee Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

Calories: 160

Calories from fat: 20

Sugar (g): 31

Fat (g): 2.5

Caffeine (mg): 65

Carbohydrates (g): 31

Cholesterol (mg): 10

Sodium (mg): 160

Protein (g): 3

4. Starbucks Java Chip Frappuccino Drink

This lovely frapp is a combination of classic ingredients like Starbucks coffee, mocha sauce, coffee frappuccino syrup, frappuccino chips, milk, ice, and whipped cream.

It’s a super-charged mocha and chocolate-ey flavored blended drink that’s both refreshing and a source of energy. Although it has more sugar, calories, sodium, and fat than other frappuccinos on this list, it still rings in at under 400 calories.

Learn about the nutritional profile of a Java Chip Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

Calories: 320

Calories from fat: 120

Sugar (g): 43

Fat (g): 13

Caffeine (mg): 75

Carbohydrates (g): 46

Dietary fiber (g): 2

Cholesterol (mg): 30

Sodium (mg): 180

Protein (g): 4

5. Starbucks Vanilla Bean Creme Frappuccino

This is a classic Starbucks frapp flavor, combining ingredients like milk, ice, vanilla bean powder, creme frappuccino syrup, and whipped cream!

It’s more on the heavy/creamy side of the frapp menu, but it still falls below 300 calories and is caffeine-free for those who want something less jolting in their iced Starbucks drink.

Learn about the nutritional profile of a Vanilla Bean Creme Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

Calories: 260

Calories from fat: 110

Sugar (g): 35

Fat (g): 12

Caffeine (mg): none

Carbohydrates (g): 35

Cholesterol (mg): 35

Sodium (mg): 170

Protein (g): 4

6. Starbucks Snickerdoodle Mocha Crème Frappuccino® Frappuccino

With just a touch of caffeine and delicious flavors from caramel to toffee nut and cinnamon dolce, this cookie-flavored frapp is a hot commodity at Starbucks. It also contains milk, ice, whipped cream, mocha sauce, and cinnamon sugar, so beware of the sugar content!

It’s still under 300 calories while remaining totally sweet and refreshing as a cold blended drink.

Learn about the nutritional profile of a Snickerdoodle Mocha Creme Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

Calories: 260

Calories from fat: 130

Sugar (g): 29

Fat (g): 14

Caffeine (mg): 5

Carbohydrates (g): 30

Cholesterol (mg): 45

Sodium (mg): 150

Protein (g): 4

7. Starbucks Chai Creme Frappuccino Drink

Fans of Starbucks’ iced chai latte who want a thicker and more dessert-like drink will enjoy the Chai Creme Frappuccino beverage. It’s complete with chai tea concentrate, milk, ice, creme frappuccino syrup, cinnamon, and whipped cream for a spicy yet sweet drink.

This is another great, under-300-calories frappuccino choice if you want something sweet yet caffeinated.

Learn about the nutritional profile of a Chai Creme Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

Calories: 230

Calories from fat: 100

Sugar (g): 29

Fat (g): 11

Caffeine (mg): 20

Carbohydrates (g): 29

Cholesterol (mg): 35

Sodium (mg): 160

Protein (g): 4

8. Starbucks White Chocolate Creme Frappuccino

The White Chocolate Creme Frappuccino is another good choice for fans of sweet, creamy, and mocha-ey flavors in their blended drink. It’s still under 300 calories, while incorporating delicious flavors of milk, whipped cream, creme frappuccino syrup, ice, and white chocolate mocha sauce.

Starbucks describes this frapp as “smooth” and refreshing.

Take a look at the nutritional profile of a White Chocolate Creme Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

Calories: 250

Calories from fat: 110

Sugar (g): 31

Fat (g): 13

Caffeine (mg): none

Carbohydrates (g): 31

Cholesterol (mg): 35

Sodium (mg): 190

Protein (g): 5

9. Starbucks Caramel Frappuccino

Caramel is one of Starbucks’ classic flavors for drinks - whether hot or cold. The Caramel Frappuccino is no exception, combining caramel sauce, caramel syrup, coffee frappuccino syrup, milk, ice, coffee, and whipped cream.

Some people enjoy this blended beverage served affogato-style, but the original style is just as delicious.

Take a look at the nutritional profile of a Caramel Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

Calories: 260

Calories from fat: 100

Sugar (g): 37

Fat (g): 11

Caffeine (mg): 60

Carbohydrates (g): 38

Cholesterol (mg): 35

Sodium (mg): 160

Protein (g): 3

10. Starbucks Double Chocolaty Chip Creme Frappuccino

With just under 300 calories, this extra chocolate-ey, creamy frappuccino drink is a favorite among fans of sweets. It combines milk, ice, frappuccino chips, whipped cream, mocha sauce, and creme frappuccino syrup.

It even includes a little bit of caffeine if you want more than your typical frappuccino allows.

Take a look at the nutritional profile of a Double Chocolaty Chip Creme Frappuccino drink at Starbucks:

Calories: 290

Calories from fat: 130

Sugar (g): 33

Fat (g): 14

Caffeine (mg): 10

Carbohydrates (g): 36

Cholesterol (mg): 35

Sodium (mg): 190

Protein (g): 5

Skinny Frappuccinos - What Are They?

The word “skinny” means that the frappuccino uses no whipped cream, replaces syrup with sugar-free syrup, and switches to non-fat milk. “Skinny” is another way to request a “light” frapp.

Frequently Asked Questions About Low-Calorie Starbucks Frapps

Can you order a “light” frapp at Starbucks?

Yes, this is the same as ordering a “skinny” frapp. For example, a Tall Light Caramel Frappuccino is only 100 calories.

What is the Starbucks drink with the least calories?

Hot tea or hot black coffee are your lowest-calorie options on the beverage menu, with 0-5 calories total.

Does Starbucks make “non-fat” frappuccinos?

You can get your frappuccino modified to have less fat, but all milk alternatives contain fat, and many ingredients still contain some fat.

How many calories are in a light caramel frappuccino?

There are 100 calories in a Tall Light Caramel Frappuccino, 140 calories in a Grande, and 190 calories in a Venti.


The 4 Main Types of Coffee Roasts

If you’re passionate about your cappuccinos, cold brews, and caramel macchiatos, then you would naturally want to find out more about how this heavenly beverage is made. And learning the types of coffee roasts is a great place to start.

Traditionally, there are 4 main types of coffee roasts: light, medium, medium-dark, and dark. The former has the most caffeine, while the medium roast is considered to be the most popular one. A medium-dark is perfect for those who hate acidity and a dark roast is usually the right type for extra dense beans.

What roast type should you go for the next time you’ll be getting your traditional morning coffee? Let’s figure that out!

What Is Coffee Roasting?

Roasting is the exact process that transforms the physical and chemical properties of a green coffee bean that, ultimately, makes it possible for us to enjoy the unique flavor and aroma of coffee.

The coffee cherry seed will typically get heated up in a commercial roaster that looks like a cross between a clothes dryer and a pizza over.

During the process, the beans go through a few stages that lead to the birth of one of the types of coffee roasts. The roast directly affects the appearance of the coffee and its flavor, so knowing what type of roast you prefer will help you enjoy your coffee-consuming experience to the fullest.

The 4 Main Types of Coffee Roasts

Traditionally, coffee roasts fall under four main categories – light, medium, medium-dark, and, finally, dark roast.

Light Roast

You might notice that light roasts are also sometimes called ‘half city’, ‘light city’, and ‘white coffee’.

  • The beans have a light brown color
  • Don’t have any oil on the surface
  • Are quite acidic
  • Out of all the other types of roasts, contain the most caffeine

If you are ready to dive even deeper into the topic, then let’s have a look at the different types of light roast.

Cinnamon roast

The word ‘cinnamon’ has nothing to do with how the bean is going to taste. The roast was named that way because of its beautiful color.

The beans that have been removed from the roaster right after the first crack are the ones that are usually referred to as ‘cinnamon roast’. To achieve such a state, the beans have to be roasted at around 385 degrees Fahrenheit.

This type of roast is not commonly used for commercial or home brewing.

New England roast

The color of a New England roast is a tiny bit darker than that of a Cinnamon roast. The beans are roasted at around 400 F.

You can really taste the coffee’s origin at this point. If you truly want to be able to tell the difference between two different types of coffee beans, then roast them to this level and then taste the beverages side by side (like a real pro).

Medium Roast

The common names of this roast are ‘breakfast roast’ and ‘regular roast’.

  • The beans have a medium brown color (close to the color of cocoa or milk chocolate)
  • The first crack has already ended, but the second has not begun yet
  • The beans are either not oily or only have a few flecks of oil
  • More smoke starts coming from the roaster

American roast

American roast is not exactly a full medium roast. A lot of experts like to think of it as something in-between a light and a medium.

The beans get roasted at 410 F.

City roast

This is what most coffee addicts would expect a medium roast to taste like. You can sometimes hear people referring to this roast as ‘bright’.

The temperature in the roaster should be held at around 430 F to be able to create the perfect City roast.

Medium-Dark Roast

Also known as ‘after dinner roast’, ‘light French’, and ‘light espresso’.

  • The beans have a richer brown color (like dark chocolate)
  • The roast gets pulled during the first few snaps of the second crack
  • There can be an oily sheen

Full City roast

Go for a Full City roast, if you are a fan of medium-dark roasts and opt for a Full City+, if you are the adventurous type who likes their coffee to be as close to the border of the ‘dark side’ as possible (but not quite there yet).

For a medium-dark, the beans get roasted at around 435 F.

Dark Roast

A dark roast comes with a lot of names – ‘New Orleans roast’, ‘Spanish roast’, ‘European’, ‘Neapolitan’, ‘Continental roast’, ‘Espresso roast’.

Some companies will have a scale that aligns all their dark roasts. The Spanish roast, for example, can be darker than the Italian one, and so on (bear in mind that there is no universal arrangement).

  • The beans are deep brown, nearly black in color
  • The oily sheen becomes even more pronounced (in fact, some beans can have a few oil droplets on them)
  • This type of roast is the lowest in caffeine

Vienna/Viennese roast

This classic dark roast goes right past the second crack (halfway to the third one). At this point, the majority of beans will start losing their original notes. It is generally not recommended to go any darker.

The roasting temperature is held at about 435 F.

French roast

Such coffee beans are also known as ‘double roasted’ and they are prepared at 460 F.

Italian roast

Anything that is roasted over a temperature of around 460 F is classified as ‘Italian roast’. Zero flavors and a burnt taste – these aren’t exactly the qualities that you would want your coffee to exhibit.

The Flavor Profiles of Different Coffee Roasts

  • Light roast

The first phase at which coffee actually becomes drinkable. Even though the beans will finally start looking and smelling like coffee, they are still quite underdeveloped and will have a grassy taste.

Cinnamon and New England roasts have a pronounced acidity and a ‘toasted grain’ flavor.

  • Medium roast

Perhaps, the most popular type of roast as it offers the best of both worlds – you’ll get to enjoy the flavor of the bean’s origin (nutty, floral, fruity notes) without the acidity that is often present in light roasts.

  • Medium-dark roast

This is a great choice for those willing to remove the acidity from their drink. At this stage, the earthy and spicy notes are going to start dominating, while the floral and fruity origin flavors will become a bit muted.

Pacific and East Indian coffees are, in general, the most suitable ones for a medium-dark roast as they naturally have spicy notes in them.

  • Dark roast

You will start tasting less of the original flavors and more of the actual roasting. The beverage can appear burnt and, at one point, it might not matter any longer what beans you have in the roaster as they’ll all have the same taste.

With that being said, some extra dense beans will be able to maintain an original flavor even after they get into the dark territory.

What Do Coffee Beans Look Like Before Roasting?

Raw coffee beans are green and have a completely different texture, smell, and look. Essentially, raw beans are a part of a plant with a grassy, bitter, or chalky taste.

Why Can’t We Drink Unroasted Coffee?

Green coffee beans have a hard ‘skin’ and taste nothing like our beloved beverage. To make the coffee drinkable, you need to get rid of these plant compounds (like chlorophyll and anthocyanins, for example).

During the process of roasting, over 800 compounds get transformed. And this chemical transformation is exactly what makes the beans suitable for making delicious coffees.

Can You Roast Your Own Beans?

If you manage to get your hands on green coffee beans, you can try to roast them on your own by using a pan, the oven, or even a popcorn machine!

After 3-5 minutes, you will hear the first crack that indicates that your beans have already been lightly roasted (this is the minimum amount of time required to produce a batch of beans for your future coffee).

You would also have to figure out how to store your freshly roasted beans, but the whole experience is definitely fun and rewarding.

Coffee Roasting Stages

Whether the beans have been placed in a commercial roaster or on a simple pan, it doesn’t really matter. These little guys would have to go through the following stages in order to turn into the fantastic end product.

  1. Drying stage
  2. Browning stage
  3. Roasting (development) stage

What Is a Breve & How Is It Different from a Latte?

At times, making up your mind at a local coffee shop might be quite tough – there are just too many options on the menu. So, in the end, you find yourself leaving the place with a traditional latte or a cold brew.

However, if you’re a fan of coffee with milk, you might want to get out of your comfort zone next time and order a delicious breve.

A breve coffee is made out of espresso and steamed half-and-half (1:1). The half-and-half is the ingredient that makes a breve different from a latte that is made with regular milk. A mixture of heavy cream and milk makes a breve extra creamy, dense, and sweet.

What Is a Breve?

A breve is a coffee beverage that is a mix of espresso and steamed half-and-half. Just like a lot of other beverages, a breve is topped up with milk foam.

The main trick here is to add equal parts of steamed half-and-half and brewed espresso. But wait a minute…what is this mysterious half-and-half anyway?

The special ingredient is made out of whole milk and heavy cream. The blend is usually about 10-12% fat and has a much denser and creamier consistency than plain milk.

In fact, steamed half-and-half is the exact ingredient that gives your espresso that extra special touch and turns it into a rich breve.

The History of Breve Coffee

Breve coffee, café breve, breve latte, or simply ‘breve’. This beverage is an Americanized version of an Italian classic – latte.

No one knows for sure who created the coffee drink and when. All we know is that it originated in the United States, perhaps, in an attempt to make a beverage that would be a bit sweeter than the more widespread coffees.

In Italian, ‘breve’ means ‘short, little, concise, or brief’. The drink might have been named that way because half-and-half can’t rise as high as plain milk. Or the term ‘short’ simply refers to the short shot of espresso used in the beverage as the base.

How Do You Pronounce Breve?

Don’t let any pronunciation-related issues stop you from ordering a delicious breve on your next trip to the coffee shop!

It might seem tempting to say ‘breev’, but the Italian pronunciation of ‘breve’ is actually ‘breh-veh’.

With that being said, we should not forget that breve coffee is a beverage created in the US, so you can certainly get away with calling the drink ‘breh-vay’ (like in ‘hurray’) which is the American way of pronouncing it.

What Does a Breve Coffee Taste Like?

The espresso shot is the ingredient that is going to provide that strong coffee flavor and the half-and-half will add sweetness and richness flavor-wise and creaminess texture-wise.

This is a high-fat drink that is already quite sweet. So, even the coffee addicts that love their beverage to be extra sweet might sometimes not add any sweetener to their breve.

This is the perfect type of coffee to have as an occasional treat or even instead of your usual dessert.

The creamy, rich, sweet breve feels indulgent (but not too over the top) and a lot more flavorful than the more ‘traditional’ coffees. It is definitely an amazing choice for the coffeeholics who are in search of a more adventurous way to please their palettes.

Ordering a Breve Coffee at Starbucks

There is one important thing about breves and Starbucks that you should know. You won’t get the creamy deliciousness that we have been talking about, in case you simply ask for a breve at this coffee heaven.

The barista might simply hand you a steamed half-and-half (which is, of course, not what you’re going for). The trick here is that at Starbucks, breve is not really served as a stand-alone drink, it is thought of more as an add-on to your favorite coffee.

For example, you can ask for a breve cappuccino, and instead of using plain milk, the barista will prepare your beverage using steamed half-and-half.

To get the traditional version of a breve, forget about the fancy Italian name and simply order an espresso with steamed half-and-half instead of regular milk.

You can also go ahead and order a ‘breve latte’ to get a more indulgent version of the traditional latte. To be fair, you can do this with practically any drink, if you’re willing to add an extra layer of depth to your coffee.

Do bear in mind that you won’t see a breve on the menu, but don’t let that stop you from ordering the yummy beverage. Any barista at Starbucks (and practically any other coffee shop) will be able to make your little wish come true.

Ordering a Breve Coffee at Dutch Bros

If you’re looking for a place that respects and truly adores all kinds of breves, then head to Dutch Bros – their selection of breve spinoffs is truly impressive. Just like in any other coffee place, you can add various syrups and drizzles to your espresso and half-and-half and modify the intensity of the drink.

For example, you can get 5 shots of espresso instead of one or add less than one regular serving of espresso to your coffee to make it sugarier and milkier. Even though the traditional ratio in breves is 1:1, you don’t have to follow the recipe - the world is your oyster.

If you don’t want to be inventing anything on your own, then you can try one of the spinoffs that the coffee shop already has on the menu.

  • Annihilator (espresso, half-and-half, and chocolate macadamia nut syrup)
  • Golden Eagle (espresso, half-and-half, vanilla syrup, and caramel sauce topped with a caramel sauce drizzle and whipped cream)
  • Kicker (espresso, half-and-half, and Irish cream syrup)
  • 9-1-1 (6 shots of espresso (!), half-and-half, and Irish cream syrup)

The Differences Between Latte & Breve

The main difference between a latte and a breve is the fact that the latter is made with half-and-half. The milk and cream mixture makes the beverage a lot thicker and richer.

Traditional lattes, on the other hand, are made with regular whole milk which makes these drinks lighter and foamier.

By the way, the ratio of espresso to milk in a breve is 1:1, while in a latte it’s 1:3. So, if you’re on the hunt for a beverage with a stronger coffee flavor, then a breve might be the right choice for you.

Is a Breve Healthier?

Of course, the number of calories is going to depend on the type of milk used and the toppings, but if we’re talking about plain lattes and breves, then the same size of a breve will have more calories in it.

You get these extra calories from the half-and-half used in the drink.

Is a Breve Sweeter?

A half-and-half has higher sugar content than regular milk, so breves are usually sweeter than plain lattes.

The sweetness is actually one of the main reasons why a lot of people are drawn to breve coffees and get it as a treat every once in a while.

How to Make a Breve at Home

  1. Prepare your two shots of espresso (for a traditional breve, you are going to need around 2 ounces of coffee).
  2. To prepare your half-and-half, combine equal parts of heavy cream and whole milk.
  3. Steam the half-and-half (make sure that it’s very cold). Ideally, you would want to steam your mixture in a small metal milk jug.
  4. When pouring the steamed half-and-half into your mug, hold the foam with a spoon. Once you’ve finished with the pouring, add a spoon of foam to the top of your drink.

Keto-Friendly Breve Coffee

It is possible to make a keto-friendly version of a breve if you find the right substitution for the half-and-half.

You can mix equal parts of hot water and heavy cream or go for full-fat coconut milk, coconut cream, or nut milk (the last few options would be vegan-friendly as well).

Of course, it won’t be a pure version of a breve coffee, but some coffeeholics admit that they actually prefer almond or cashew milk in their half-and-half as it adds a unique taste to the coffee.

Other Breve-Style Drinks

There are plenty of breve-style drinks out there that you might want to give a try. Simply look for the beverages that have espresso and half-and-half in them.

The barista can experiment with the amount of coffee or add delicious syrups and toppings that will take your breve experience to a whole new level.


Iced Macchiato vs. Iced Latte (Explanation & Recipe)

Introduction

Have you ever wondered what the differences are between an iced macchiato and an iced latte? If you aren’t sure which to choose the next time you are in a cafe or you want to try making some fancy coffees at home, it’s important to understand this.

An iced latte is three parts milk and one part espresso, poured across ice. Iced lattes often have additional flavorings, too. A macchiato can vary depending on the cafe, but it is often two shots of espresso with a little steamed milk poured on top. The two drinks are very similar in most cases.

Iced Latte Compared With Iced Macchiato

Iced Latte

An iced latte is generally quite a standardized drink, and it usually consists of one part coffee to a ratio of three parts milk. The two ingredients are poured over ice to chill them, and they often have flavorings added to alter the overall taste of the coffee. It's also worth noting that iced lattes often contain low fat milk, rather than full fat.

Some cafes will also add more coffee to increase the strength of the latte, using two shots of espresso and two or three shots of milk. This alters the flavor significantly, but it does still amount to the same thing – an iced coffee that is not enormously strong.

Iced Macchiato

An iced macchiato is an odd form of the drink because macchiatos were traditionally served hot. Two shots of espresso would be brewed, and then the barista would add up to two teaspoons of full fat steamed milk to the cup. This milk would spread across the surface, marbling the color. Sometimes, the espresso is poured over the milk instead, but neither version is stirred.

This is what led to the name macchiato, which means “marked” or “spotted.” It also means that macchiatos were always served hot, with both the espresso and the milk being heated before being combined.

Turning this into a cold drink often undoes this “stained” look and, by many people’s standards, turns the macchiato into a different drink. This may be why many coffee shops vary so widely in what they call an iced macchiato. You will often find that a macchiato in a cafe is mostly made of chilled milk, with a couple of shots of espresso.

This has led to a lot of confusion, because this is essentially an iced latte too. If we compare how popular cafes make the two drinks, you’ll notice there is a lot of overlap. For example, Dunkin Donuts makes an iced macchiato by pouring two shots of espresso over milk and ice, and makes an iced latte by pouring a shot of espresso and milk over ice.

Similarly, Starbucks makes an iced latte by pouring two shots of espresso and milk over ice, and makes a caramel iced macchiato by pouring two shots of espresso over ice and milk and adding vanilla and caramel to it. Without the flavorings, this would essentially be the same drink.

Can You Combine Iced Lattes And Iced Macchiatos?

Starbucks has created an iced latte-macchiato, and it’s similar to both iced lattes and iced macchiatos. It involves pouring three shots of espresso over milk and ice – so it’s a bit stronger, but otherwise very similar. It doesn’t automatically have flavorings added, but you can request them.

How Do You Make Iced Macchiatos?

It’s easy to make iced macchiatos yourself if you fancy one on a hot summer day. You can alter the ratios to suit your tastes if you prefer, or remove the vanilla syrup and add another flavor of your choosing – or you can leave the flavors out entirely.

It only takes about 5 minutes to make this recipe, which serves 1 person.

Equipment You Need

You will require:

  • A measuring spoon

  • A tall drinking glass

  • An espresso brewer

Ingredients Required

You’re going to need:

Method

  1. Start by filling the glass with ice, leaving some space at the top so that you can add the liquids. It won’t need a lot of room, but you don’t want the glass to overflow.

  2. Brew the 2 shots of espresso and add them to the glass.

  3. Add the vanilla syrup and stir it well.

  4. Pour 1 or 2 teaspoons of milk over the espresso, and leave it unstirred to create the marbled effect that macchiatos are known for.

  5. Serve immediately.

How Do You Make Iced Lattes?

An iced latte is also easy to make yourself at home, and you can again leave the syrup flavoring out of it if you prefer. If you like vanilla, leave the syrup in and enjoy this slightly modified version of the drink.

Equipment You Need

You will require:

  • A measuring spoon

  • A tall drinking glass

  • An espresso brewer

Ingredients Required

You’re going to need:

  • Crushed ice

  • 3 or 4 oz of milk (adjust to suit your preference)

  • 1 or 2 shots of espresso (adjust to suit your preference)

  • Vanilla syrup

Method

  1. Start by filling the glass with ice, but again remember to leave enough space to add the milk and espresso. You will need more space for this recipe, as there is more milk in it. Make sure the glass won’t overflow when you add the milk.

  2. Brew the espresso and pour it over the ice.

  3. Pour in the 3 or 4 oz of milk.

  4. Add the vanilla syrup to taste and stir to combine all of the ingredients.

Which Drink Contains More Coffee?

As a rule of thumb, a macchiato tends to have more coffee in it than a latte, and it’s a stronger drink. This is only a generalization, however, as different cafes make the drinks in different ways. Often, both a macchiato and a latte will contain 2 shots of espresso.

If you want a strong drink, it is usually best to opt for a macchiato, or ask the barista to make your latte with 2 shots of espresso. If you go to Starbucks and order their iced latte-macchiato, you will get a full 3 shots of espresso, but few cafes serve this mixed drink.

If you are making the drinks yourself at home, you can make either stronger, and the recipes will still work fine.

How Do They Compare To Cappuccinos?

To add further confusion to the coffee debate, cappuccinos also have quite a lot in common with macchiatos and lattes. However, a cappuccino is made with equal ratios of steamed milk, espresso, and foam, whereas both macchiatos and lattes use unequal ratios.

A latte will usually contain less coffee than a cappuccino, and a macchiato will usually contain less milk. Of course, you are likely to see variations depending on where you get your drink from or how you make it at home, but typically, a cappuccino is milkier than a macchiato and stronger than a latte.

FAQs

Q: Should you stir an iced macchiato?

A: No, it’s best not to stir an iced macchiato. The point of a macchiato is to create a stained appearance by adding the milk to the top of the drink and not mixing it in. When you stir the milk in, you are almost making a latte, which is why the recipe above suggests adding the vanilla syrup and stirring it into the coffee before you add the milk.

Q: Should you stir an iced latte?

A: Yes, an iced latte is a mixed drink and it’s fine to stir it. Add the milk and then use a spoon to mix it into the coffee, along with any syrup that you wish to add.

Q: How strong should a macchiato be?

A: Macchiatos can vary in strength, but it is common to add two shots of espresso to them, and only a small amount of milk. Macchiatos will rarely have less than two shots of espresso.

Q: How strong should a latte be?

A: Lattes can also vary, but most contain only one shot of espresso, and three shots of milk. Some will have two shots of espresso, so remember to check with the cafe if you don’t like strong coffee.

Conclusion

Iced lattes and iced macchiatos have a lot in common, and if you are thinking of getting one, it’s worth checking how the cafe makes it. These drinks can vary quite a lot. Iced macchiatos in particular can cause confusion, and fewer cafes offer this drink – but it is available in some places and it is easy to make at home if you prefer.


The 10 Best Drinks You Can Get At Dutch Bros

If you live in one of the 11 states that they currently serve, you’ve probably seen one of the modern-looking blue and gray Dutch Bros. locations. Familiar customers certainly have their favorites, but someone who has never been can be intimidated by the expansive menu of brew options.

The best drinks to grab from Dutch Bros. are:

  • Ninja
  • Unicorn Blood
  • Nitro-Infused Cold Brew
  • Golden Eagle Vanilla and Caramel Breve with Caramel Drizzle
  • Cocomo
  • Annihilator Chocolate Macadamia Nut Breve
  • Double Rainbro
  • 911
  • White Chocolate Chai Latte
  • Electric Berry

In this article we dive into what's so enigmatic about the Dutch Bros. brand and explain why these 10 drinks are a favorite of many. Keep reading to find your new favorite drink or the confidence to finally roll up to that window and order for the first time..

A Bit About Dutch Bros.

While the business has a major following now, brothers Dane and Travis Boersma actually got their start back in 1992. They left their work in the dairy industry to start serving espresso on a push cart by the railroad tracks.

This not only gave them the chance to operate under their favorite tunes, but they finally had an opportunity to connect with and serve their community.

In 2002, the two (assisted by friends and family) opened their very first Dutch Bros. franchise location in Oregon. In the decades following, the business has boomed, and they now serve 11 states along the west coast, expanding as far as Texas and Oklahoma.

The company has hosted company-wide giveback programs since 2006, helping the community through initiatives like:

  • Dutch Luv
  • Drink One for Dane
  • Buck for Kids

Whether you want variety with your drink options, you like supporting community-minded businesses, or you prefer quality coffee at a lower price, the Dutch Bros. story has your best interests in mind.

The Best Drinks from Dutch Bros.

While there is no official secret menu from Dutch Bros., you have countless opportunities to customize their base drinks to make sure they work for your palette.

These are the best options that you will find listed on their base level, and you can modify them as you see fit. From Rebel Sodas to Chai Lattes and everything in between, there is something here for everyone.

We’ve also linked the drink on the official Dutch Bros. site so you can check further into nutritional facts and similar products, so you’re fully armed to pull up and place your next favorite order.

Ninja

The Ninja falls in Dutch Bros. “frost” category, and it combines creme de menthe syrup with white chocolate syrup to create a rich mint and white chocolate drink.

This rich and refreshing combination is served topped with whipped cream, and a medium drink holds 730 calories and 127 grams of sugar.

Try it blended if you’re looking for a different consistency.

Unicorn Blood

Unicorn Blood is one of the tastiest specialty Rebel Sodas offered on the Dutch Bros. menu, and this is largely due to the decadent combination of:

  • Strawberry syrup
  • Almond syrup
  • White chocolate sauce
  • Sparkling soda water

While it’s traditionally topped with whipped cream, a splash of cream makes this iced drink that much sweeter. A medium hosts 320 calories and 62 grams of sugar, but you can also get the drink sugar-free or blended.

Nitro-Infused Cold Brew

Building on the already-popular cold brew offerings, the Nitro-Infused Cold Brew is a great choice for caffeine lovers who could do without the sugar. You get a smooth and creamy taste to provide day-long energy.

A medium Nitro Cold Brew has 20 calories and is sugar free. This is the perfect iced drink to get you by after a tiring morning or prep you for a heavy workload.

Golden Eagle Vanilla and Caramel Breve with Caramel Drizzle

The Golden Eagle is a Dutch Classic, and you haven’t witnessed it in all its glory without trying the Vanilla and Caramel Breve with Caramel Drizzle.

If the name didn’t tip you off, this is a caramel lover’s dream. This is an expert combination of:

  • Espresso
  • Half and half
  • Vanilla syrup
  • Caramel sauce

All of that comes topped with whipped cream and a tasteful caramel drizzle, all for 480 calories and 37 grams of sugar. While iced is the default, you can also try this hot or blended.

Cocomo

Who doesn’t want more coconut?

If you fall into that category, the Cocomo is perfect for you. This Coconut Mocha is commonly served as a blended freeze, but you can get it hot or iced as well.

Whatever works best to serve you one of the most indulgent drinks from Dutch Bros., but don’t forget the whipped cream topping.

The blended, being the most popular option, comes in on top with 730 calories and 100 grams of sugar.

Annihilator Chocolate Macadamia Nut Breve

Annihilator may be an intimidating name, but this Chocolate Macadamia Nut Breve proves that nuts and chocolate are the best of friends. This is another perfect blend of espresso, half and half, and chocolate macadamia nut syrup.

A medium Annihilator sits at 470 calories and 50 grams of sugar, and you can enjoy the drink hot, iced, or blended.

Double Rainbro

What’s better than a double rainbow? A Double Rainbro!

This may be the only tea on the list, but it’s also the only tea you need. You can enjoy it iced in the summer or hot in the colder months, ensuring you don’t need to take a break from the sweet relief of:

  • Strawberry syrup
  • Peach syrup
  • Coconut syrup

The 180 calories and 42 grams of sugar in a medium aren’t show stopping, and this can serve as the rainbow on top for the gloomiest of days.

9-1-1

If you hear someone calling for a 9-1-1 at Dutch Bros., it’s pretty safe to assume they’re ordering this 6-Shot Irish Cream Breve.

This is a spin on the Dutch Classic breve, and it jams in six shots of espresso with half and half and Irish cream syrup to provide you with enough caffeine to pack a punch.

We recommend it blended (with a medium at 760 calories and 119 grams of sugar) to unlock the drink’s complete potential, but you can get it hot or iced as well.

White Chocolate Chai Latte

Like spiced chai? This White Chocolate Chai Latte should be right up your alley.

This sweeter take on chai brings together spiced chai tea, white chocolate sauce, and milk to offer you a drink to divulge in.

A medium iced chai comes at 380 calories and 63 grams of sugar, but you can also get the drink hot on cold weather days.

Electric Berry

The Electric Berry is another favorite soda from Dutch Bros., this time without the caffeine. The zapping taste comes from a perfect combination of:

  • Lime syrup
  • Blue raspberry syrup
  • Sparkling water

While this is a soda, you should get the drink topped with whipped cream as a treat. A medium weighs in at 310 calories and 66 grams of sugar.

What Makes Dutch Bros. So Good

Dutch Bros. serves up the perfect blend of fantastic drinks and community-based thinking. While their endless possibilities, low prices, and customer service are enough reason to visit, you’ll be pleased to find an effort to connect with the local community.

Countless Customization Possibilities

The baseline for the Dutch Bros. menu is your first hint at the endless drink combinations available, offering you:

  • Classic brews
  • Cold brew
  • Dutch Freeze
  • Americano
  • Rebel Energy
  • Tea
  • Smoothies
  • Lemonade
  • Dutch Soda

The list goes on from there to encompass chai, cocoa, and more. When you start to factor in all the flavored syrups, topping options, and even goodies like muffins, you won’t leave a Dutch Bros. empty handed.

Reasonable Prices Compared to Competition

It’s not easy to find quality drinks at a low price, but Dutch Bros. focuses on keeping prices low, and they’re often a steal compared to certain other coffee shop franchises.

It may come down to personal preference, but your wallet is bound to be happier when you frequent the blue and gray bricks.

Dutch Bros. Customer Service

Dutch Bros. customer service is so good that being greeted by a smile is memeable.

Whether you’re starting your day or you're looking for your favorite drink to boost your spirits, rolling away from the window is bound to leave you a bit brighter than before.

Dutch Bros. Focuses on Community

The company puts in an effort to leave a lasting impact on their communities, and they focus on sustainability, equity, and inclusion at their stores.

You’re likely to see initiatives like:

  • Dutch Luv Day: $1 from every drink one day in February donated to local organizations fighting food insecurity
  • Drink One for Dane: in honor of co-founder Dane Boersma; raises funds for the Muscular Dystrophy Association in hopes to find the cause and cure for ALS
  • Buck for Kids Day: $1 from every drink one day in September donated to nonprofits that aim to create a brighter future for children in your community

You can find more information on Dutch Bros. community goals on their Impact page.


How Many Shots Of Espresso Is Too Much?  

The smell of coffee is enough to stimulate the mind, getting you ready for the day. Though it’s tempting to chug a ton, each person has limits, and there’s a point where it’s best to throw in the towel. Can you overdose from espresso and, if so, how many does it take to walk the line? We’ll answer both below.

The short answer…

Different people respond differently to caffeine, making it difficult to come up with one quantity that could lead to toxicity. Studies show that 47 shots of espresso are means for lethal dosage that can cause drastic effects in consumers. According to the FDA, it’s recommended to have no more than 6 shots of espresso per day.

Table Of Contents

  • Healthy limits
  • How much caffeine is too much?
  • Symptoms of overconsumption of caffeine
  • How many shots of espresso will kill you?
  • Is caffeine okay for children?
  • Breaking caffeine habits How to do it without withdrawals
  • Factors that increase caffeine sensitivity

Healthy limits

This information is by no means meant to scare anyone away from enjoying coffee. Coffee boasts many benefits when enjoyed in moderation, including alertness and smoother digestion. Just like with any other food or beverage, espresso is best enjoyed in moderation, ensuring not to exceed healthy limits.

According to the FDA, it’s recommended to have no more than 6 shots of espresso per day. As far as cups of coffee, 5 to 6 is considered in the healthy range. Going over these amounts could lead to caffeine toxicity or a wide range of other side effects like nausea, headaches, and quickened heart rate.

When considering healthy limits, the key thing to remember is that all individuals respond differently to espresso. You may need to talk to your doctor to determine your response and make sure that you’re not drinking too much.

How much caffeine is too much?

When speaking about caffeine, experts tend to measure in milligrams. To put that into perspective, each 8oz. cup of coffee has about 70 to 140mg. When consuming espresso rapidly, there have been reports of toxic effects when consuming over 1200mg.

In a day, 400 milligrams of caffeine are considered a safe amount. That equivalates to about 4 to 5 cups of coffee a day. This is not just espresso but also pressed coffee and other items that contain caffeine like soda, tea, and medications.

Though this is a standard estimate, everyone responds to caffeine differently. Some are hypersensitive, getting anxiety and jitters when drinking only a cup. It’s best to observe your sensations after a cup and stop drinking if you start to feel common symptoms of overconsumption.

Symptoms of overconsumption of caffeine

When you drink large amounts of coffee, especially over a short period of time, you may start to feel anxious or nervous. If you suspect that you’ve drunk or consumed too much, here are some symptoms to look for.

  • Increased heart rate
  • Rapid breathing
  • Anxiousness
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Jitters
  • Strange dysphoric sensation
  • Stomach pain
  • Vomiting

How many shots of espresso will kill you?

Rapid consumption of 12 to 14 shots of espresso has led to seizures and death in some individuals. For the day, toxic amounts of espresso are considered anything over 156 shots. 156 shots of espresso is a large amount of coffee, causing the body to react.

Your body is a smart piece of machinery and will likely not allow you to digest more than you need without some warning signs. You may feel nauseous and start to vomit if you’re getting close to your limits, so be sure to watch for these kinds of symptoms.

Is caffeine okay for children?

Adults can be sensitive to caffeine and so can children. It’s recommended not to give children too much caffeine, especially staying away from beverages and foods with high concentration. As far as espresso, most experts say to avoid giving it to children, especially those who are under the age of 15.

Just like with any kind of food or drink, moderation is key. There is nothing wrong with a sip here and there, especially if children enjoy the taste. For the most part, they tend to not like it, only later developing a taste for it.

Breaking caffeine habits How to do it without withdrawals

Caffeine is a stimulant and can cause those who are prone to addiction to develop a need. When cutting off consumption, those who have formed an addiction can feel anxious and start to get a headache without consumption.

These feelings can have an effect on the mood, as the body and the mind feel like they are missing something. To reduce caffeine consumption without the negative side effects, it’s recommended to reduce consumption gradually.

For instance, if typical consumption is 5 shots of espresso a day, it’s recommended to reduce to 4, then to 3, until stopping at the desired amount. Symptoms of withdrawal are unpleasant but do not pose any risks to the health and will not cause toxicity in those who have been drinking coffee heavily for years.

Factors that increase caffeine sensitivity

If you suspect that you’re sensitive to caffeine, you may want to talk to your doctor. There is no one definition of how your body will react, though there are some factors that can contribute to an increased sensitivity, a few of which are listed below.

Your sex

Women have a particular set of enzymes and microbes that allow them to digest caffeine quickly. It’s for this reason that they are typically less sensitive to caffeine than men. Men take a long time to digest caffeine and can therefore feel more sensitive to it.

Your medication

Some medications, especially birth control, can cause the body to become more sensitive to caffeine. It’s best to talk to your doctor about caffeine consumption and your current set of medications to make sure that there are no negative reactions and interactions.

Your genetics

Genetics plays a major role in a lot of things. One of them is how your body digests and interacts with foods. Those with close relatives that have a sensitivity could also be prone to developing a sensitivity, lacking some of the genes necessary for digestion.

One such gene is ADORA2A, which synthesizes caffeine and plays a role in the effect of caffeine on sleep.

Your usual consumption

Many people have coffee every day, developing a reduced sensitivity over time. However, there are some that have an occasional cup of coffee. Those that do not typically drink coffee can be more sensitive to caffeine, feeling jittery and anxious quickly after consuming.

Your disorders

Some disorders, like anxiety and depression, tend to worsen when exposed to high levels of caffeine. Caffeine is a stimulant and may make the mind and heart race, leading to more intense symptoms. Those with disorders that affect the mood should carefully monitor their body’s response to caffeine.

Final thoughts

Espresso is a great start to anyone’s day, boosting the mood and stimulating the mind. Though it can be beneficial in some ways, drinking too much can come with dangerous and unpleasant side effects. If you feel like you have a sensitivity, talk to your doctor to find the cause and take steps to gradually reduce consumption.

Drinking more than 156 shots of espresso can kill you, though that’s not an easy number to reach. The key is enjoying in moderation and keeping the body from a sudden reaction.


What Is An Upside Down Espresso At Starbucks?

Starbucks has a massive menu, and their online “secret menu” has even more drinks than are offered in store. Do you want to order your Starbucks like a pro? Do you want to try out new drinks?

An upside down drink at Starbucks is when the milk, syrup, and/or foam of a drink is layered in a different position than usual. An upside down espresso will have the foam at the bottom of the drink, below the expresso, instead of at the top. 

Caffeine content levels differ from drink to drink, and there is special lingo that every Starbucks goer must know. From ristretto to flat whites to macchiatos and lattes, this article will help you find the right specialty Starbucks drink for you.

What does upside down shot mean?

An upside down shot means that the espresso in a latte is added last, instead of first. Typically, the espresso is poured first into the cup, making it sit at the bottom. In an upside down shot, the milk is poured first and then the coffee and foam are layered on top.

In an Espresso Macchiato, traditionally, there are two shots of espresso and then a dollop of foam on top. If you were to order an Upside Down Espresso Macchiato, the foam would be beneath the espresso, rather than on top.

One of the more popular drinks, Iced Caramel Macchiatos, are usually made by first layering the syrup, then milk, then ice, and finally two shots of espresso. An Upside Down Caramel Macchiato is made in reverse, with the expresso at the bottom of the cup.

What are two shots of espresso called at Starbucks?

If you want to order your Starbucks like a pro, you can call your two shots of espresso a “Doppio”, which means “double” in Italian. Some baristas may not be familiar with this term, so you may be better off just using the phrase “double shot”.

In most coffee shops, two shots of espresso are the regular amount included in standard drinks. If you want three shots you can say “triple” and for four shots you’ll want to use the word “quad”.

What does ristretto mean at Starbucks?

The word “Ristretto” at Starbucks means that the espresso short is short, also known as restricted. To make a ristretto shot, the barista will use less hot water than in a regular espresso shot. The same grounds are used, but the amount of time that the barista spends pouring the hot water over the espresso will be shorter.

Ristretto shots at Starbucks are smaller, more concentrated espresso shots. They are about 15-20 mL of espresso, rather than the 25-35 mL found in traditional espresso. For this reason, they are more concentrated.

What’s a ristretto Starbucks?

Different flavor profiles of espresso develop depending on how much hot water is used. At the beginning of the pour, the espresso is more sweet, acidic, and rich. At the end of the pour, the espresso can develop a more bitter and diluted taste.

Since the ristretto shot only contains the beginning of the espresso pour, the flavor profile is sweeter and richer than a typical espresso shot. Due to this, the ristretto has a distinct lack of bitterness. This does not mean, however, that it has more caffeine, since the drink portion size is smaller.

However, if you were to drink the same amount of ristretto and espresso, the ristretto would have a higher amount of caffeine. Ristretto shots are included in Flat Whites, but they can be added as a substitute instead of espresso in many drinks.

Starbucks recommends that you try adding ristretto shots in any of your espresso based beverages for a fully customized experience. Ristretto shots can be substituted, for an extra fee, into drinks like Caramel Macchiatos, Eggnog Lattes, Starbucks Doubleshots on ice, or Americanos.

What is an upside down Starbucks drink?

An upside down Starbucks drink is a drink that is made in the opposite order than originally intended. Some Starbucks baristas may be unhappy when you order this type of drink because they can be difficult to prepare and you may end up just ordering another style of drink.

Upside down drinks may cost extra depending on the location. Typically, however, since the same ingredients are used, the price will remain the same. If you request your Starbucks drink upside down, you should be sure to tip your barista for their extra work.

Starbucks drinks may be layered, or they may be stirred. Stirred means that the ingredients of the drink would be prepared as usual, but then blended together. If you were to order an iced macchiato, this would mean that the distinct layers of milk would be mixed together.

What is an upside down flat white?

An upside down flat white is a flat white made in reverse. Typically a flat white starts with two ristretto espresso shots and then steamed milk and microfoam are layered on top. For an upside down flat white, the ristretto shots are pulled over the steamed whole milk and foam.

The process of creating an upside down flat white is about the same as creating a latte macchiato. However, flat whites contain ristretto shots and a bit less foam. Since latte macchiatos at Starbucks are seasonal and only available for a limited time, an upside down Flat White can be a good alternative.

Is a macchiato just an upside down latte?

In general, yes, a macchiato is just an upside down latte. The word “macchiato” means marked or stained. This relates to the fact that the espresso is poured over the frothed milk, creating a “mark” where the coffee goes through the white milk.

Depending on your store location, it may be cheaper to order an upside down Caramel Macchiato than a Vanilla Latte with added caramel drizzle, even though they are essentially the same thing.

What is the strongest caffeinated drink at Starbucks?

If you want the strongest caffeinated drink at Starbucks, you should order a Venti True North Blonde Roast filter coffee, which comes in at a whopping 475 mg of caffeine.

What is an extra shot of espresso at Starbucks?

An extra shot of espresso costs 60 cents and is an additional shot in your coffee. If you were ordering a tall drink, it traditionally will come with one shot. For a grande, it will come with two. For a venti, your drink will come with three shorts.

Ordering an extra shot of espresso will add additional caffeine to your drink and it can make your drink taste more bitter and stronger than usual. To combat this change of taste, you can add additional milk or sweetener. If you are looking to get extra energy for the day, an extra shot of espresso is the way to go.

What Starbucks drink has 5 shots of espresso?

A venti Double Shot on ice has 5 shots of espresso. Five shots of espresso begins to approach the 400 mg daily limit that the EFSA recommends people stay below, so definitely do not have any other additional caffeine that day.

What drink gives you the most energy at Starbucks?

The drink at Starbucks that will give you the most energy is the venti Double Shot on ice, coming in at 375 mg of caffeine.

What is the strongest shot of espresso at Starbucks?

The Blonde Roast Starbucks espresso shot has 10 more mg of caffeine than the traditional blend espresso shot, making it the strongest shot of espresso at Starbucks.

Conclusion

Upside down Starbucks drinks are drinks that are made in reverse order.  You can customize your Starbucks drinks’ taste and caffeine content by altering the type of espresso, choosing ristretto rather than espresso, and adding extra shots of espresso.


The History and Origins of Yerba Mate

The yerba mate, or ka'a as it was initially known, is strongly associated with the Guarani tribe and South American culture, particularly in Argentina. The rite of the communal yerba mate brew is a gesture of connection, hospitality, and togetherness. The yerba mate has been an object of worship, barter, trade, and ritual and continues to find new devotees across the world.

The history and origins stretch back to at least 500 years before the Europeans arrived in what became Paraguay. The Guarani used the leaves of the yerba mate as a brew and the practice of drinking these leaf infusions. The Spanish and the Jesuits adopted this brew in the 1600s. 

The yerba mate ritual has been embraced as far afield as Syria, where early South American immigrants brought the sacred leaves back to their homeland. Once considered a gift from the gods, yerba mate has a fascinating history, most probably long before any records existed to name the plant. Read on to explore the history and origins of this unique and revered brew.

History of the Yerba Mate

The Guarani Tribe

The early Guaranis were established in Eastern Paraguay and nearby areas of Brazil and Argentina. They derive from the Tupian-speaking tribe's migration inland to the Rio de la Plata in the 14th and 15th centuries.

They lived a life based on communal semi-nomadic agricultural communities of 10 to 15 families. They lived on corn, cassava, and sweet potatoes cultivated by the women while the men hunted and fished. The first Europeans to arrive in the Guarani lands were the Spaniards who founded  Asunción, the later capital of Paraguay.

Their designation of the name yerba mate is still under some measure of debate, but most historians attribute the name to the early Spanish Jesuit missionaries who arrived in the area in 1537. The Gurarnis had merely referred to themselves as the Abá, which means men or people until the European's arrival.

The designation guarani referred to the indigenous people that embraced Christianity against the Cayuga or Caingua (ka'aguygua) or 'people of the jungle' that rejected the Christian faith. Little is known of the early Guarani people. Still, according to the Austrian missionary Martin Dobrizhoffer they practiced cannibalism as a funerary rite before opting to bury their dead in inverted funerary jars.

The tribe practiced a form of animistic pantheism, which believes that objects and places, creatures, and plants all carry a distinct spiritual essence. The Guarani had a close affinity with nature and forest and were well versed in the healing qualities of plants.

Yerba mate was long part of the early Guarani tribe's culture, and remnants of yerba mate were found in the Quechua tomb near Lima, suggesting it was an object of status. The indigenous use of yerba mate extended some 500 years before the arrival of Europeans in the 1600s.

Much of the guarani folklore and myths have survived. The Universidad Nacional de Misiones recorded many of the surviving myths in an anthology of myths and legends of the Gurani published in 1870.

A guarani myth tells of Ka'a Jarýi was a woman who came to represent the sacred herb Yerba. legend tells that After choosing to stay with her ill father over life with the moving tribe, the Guarani gods decided to reward her sacrifice.

An old shaman arrived at their hut and offered to grant her wish. The shaman gifted the young woman with yerba mate, which healed her father and allowed them to move with their tribe again.

The Early Spanish and Jesuits

When the Spanish arrived in the Guarani territory in 1537, they formed close contact with the native tribes due to their relative isolation. In communication and trade, they discovered the Guarania tradition of communal yerba mate and became instantly devoted to its use.

In fact, the Spanish colonists took so readily to the heady brew that by 1596 the thirst for the sacred herb became out of control. A local council member wrote to the governor of Rio de la Plata. He told of the Spanish greed for the yerba mate as a vice and that the Spanish would even sell their only possessions to drink the brew.

The Spanish enforced a labor system in 1538 called the Encomiendas to use the indigenous population for labor. Part of this harsh regime involved sending the Guarani deep into the forests to harvest the wild growing yerba mate, often resulting in the collector's death.

The Jesuit reductions aimed to create an environment to impart Christianity and culture to the Guarani people without interference from the Spanish colonialist rule. From the 1650s, the Jesuits achieved what no European before perfected: the yerba mate's domestication.

These Jesuits found themselves in direct competition with those who harvested their yerba mate from the wild and were often accused of glutting the market with an inferior product. This competition led to authorities imposing limits for the Jesuit exports, which they ignored.

However, there is no evidence that the Jesuits sought to make great profits over and above sustaining their order and followers in their reductions. Yerba became such a commodity that yerba mate replaced coins in currency in the Jesuit missions.

The Jesuit's closely guarded secret domestication of the yerba mate tree is thought to have been imparted by the Guarani people. Historians speculate that the involved feeding seeds to birds or mimicking the passage of the seed through the bird's digestive tract.

The priests also took to the mate brew themselves as a pastime and social beverage. The priests enjoyed the brew so much that the yerba mate, became known as "Jesuit tea"( té de Los jesuitas.) The Jesuits believed that the yerba mate was a far more healthy alternative than alcohol.

However, despite their successful trade and export of yerba mate, Spanish King Charles expelled the Jesuits, were expelled from the Guarani missions in 1767, and the plantations once again grew wild.

Yerba Mate Trade Expansion 1767-1870

After the Jesuit expulsion, excessive labor exploitation and mismanagement led to a decay in the industry. Paraguay gained a monopoly as the reducer of yerba mate, and when Concepción was founded in 1773, it became the main export port.

With the progression of reforms in free trade in 1778, yerba mate spread rapidly through South America, reaching present-day Ecuador. During further European colonization, yerba mate failed to take on as a rival caffeinated beverage to tea or coffee.

However, it came to the attention of Aimé Bonpland and Augustin Saint-Hilaire, who gave the plant its scientific name   Ilex paraguariensis 1n1819. After Paraguay's independence, Paraguay ceded yerba mate production to Brazil and Argentina.

Further History 1870-1950

By the late 19th century, Brazil became the leading producer of yerba mate. But in the early 20th century, Argentina, the largest consumer of yerba mate, began to recover in production. They allowed foreign settlers land in the Misiones Province to cultivate the mate industry.

Economic benefits Brazil prompted the country to turn to coffee production over yerba mate, once again establishing Argentina as the leading yerba mate producer. The ritual of yerba mate drinking spread via Syrian and Lebanese immigrants to their homelands and became associated with the Druze people.

Yerba Mate Origin

Yerba mate  Ilex paraguariensis is a species of the Holly family native to South America. Originally called ka'a by the indigenous Guarani tribes, the name ''yerba mate is a Spanish and  Quechua word translated as "herbs from the calabash." This name was in reference to how the indigenous peoples used dried gourds to brew the leaves of the  Ilex paraguariensis.

The yerba mate tree is subtropical, deciduous, and evergreen and grows from 8-15 meters high. The much-coveted leaves are about 8cm long and olive green which darkens on top. The leaves are wedged-shaped bases with a crenulated edge and a blunt tip.

The Yerba mate is native to South America, specifically in the regions of:

  • northern Argentina (Corrientes and Misiones)
  • Paraguay
  • Uruguay
  • Southern Brazil.

Each region has a different way of preparing the brew. Sugar, fruit and ice are just a few ways to make yerba maté taste great.

Closing Thoughts

Yerba mate is enjoyed worldwide and drunk from iconic gourds through a filtered straw called a bombilla, often made from silver. Recent studies show that the yerba mate has curative properties that the indigenous Guarani knew long before microscopes and clinical studies.

The history of the yerba mate is closely interwoven with the South American people and spans over long centuries fraught with slavery, danger, and political upheavals. However, the sharing of the traditional brew still spells togetherness and community even today.